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An American Family History

Anna Maria Bauman Seybert

 
Bauman is also spelled Baughman, Baumann, Boman, and Bowman.
 
Montgomery County, in southeast Pennsylvania was created on September 10, 1784, out of land that was originally part of Philadelphia County.

George Washington
A grist mill is a building where a miller grinds gain into flour.
Women played an essential role in American society as mothers and homemakers.

Anna Maria Bauman Seybert was the daughter of John Dietrich Bauman and Eva Elizabeth Beil. She was born July 5, 1741 in Marlborough Township, Montgomery (was Philadelphia) County, Pennsylvania.

About 1755 she moved with her family to Northampton County, Pennsylvania which is now Lower Towamensing Township, Carbon County, Pennsylvania.

She married Johann Sebastian Seybert (Sibert) about 1764 when she was about 23 years old in Northampton County. He was born 1740 in Germany. His parents were John William Seibert and Anna Eva Klein.

He arrived at the Port of Philadelphia, on the ship Chance on September 13, 1764. He served in the Revolutionary War, as a private, corporal and sergeant, in Captain Peter Roth's Company, Northampton County Militia during 1780-1781-1782.

The family lived in Salem Township, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. They

settled about 1780 near the mouth of Seybert or Varner's creek, about a mile west of Beach Haven, and built a gristmill, sawmill, clothiery and distillery. The gristmill was of logs, had one run of stones, and could grind only from four to six bushels of grain a day. The sawmill was of the old "flutterwheel" style, and would cut about 1,000 feet of lumber in twenty-four hours. The clothiery was of the most primitive kind, and the distillery was the best that could be built at that day.

Sebastian and Maria's children included:
Johann Heinrich (Henry) Seybert (1765, married Mary Margaret Gobel),
Michael Seybert (1767, married Eva Zimmerman),
Margaret (Margaretha) Seybert Kisner (1772, married Jacob Kisner),
Sebastian Seybert, Jr. (1773, married Elizabeth Thomas),
John (Hans) Dieter (Honeter, Honteter) Seybert (1776),
Bernard (Barney) Seybert (1779, married Charlotte Engle),
Nicholas Seybert (1780, married Catherine Boehm), and
Eva Elizabeth (Polly) Seybert (1782).

Sebastian died January 10, 1809 in Salem Township and Anna Maria died May 26, 1826 when she was 84 years old in Salem Township. They are buried together at the Seybert Farm Cemetery in Luzern County.

tombstone.
Aged 84 yrs; wife of Sebastian Seybert
(she shares the tombstone with other family members)

tombstone
Sebastian Seybert
1740-1809
Sgt. Co. 4, Northampton Co. Militia, 3rd Battalion

Children of
Johann Dietrich Bauman and
Eva Elizabeth Beil Bauman

  • Anna Maria Bauman Seybert
  • Sybilla Bauman Truby
  • Bernard Bauman
  • Heinrich Bauman
  • Northampton County, Pennsylvania is on the eastern border of the state in the Lehigh Valley. It was formed in 1752 from parts of Bucks County. Easton is the county seat.

    The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) was between the Kingdom of Great Britain and the 13 colonies which became the newly formed United States.

     

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    Fulling is the elimination oils and impurities in wool which makes it fuller. The process involved beating the cloth with wooden hammers. A water mill used to move the hammers was a fulling mill.

    History of Luzerne County, Pennsylvania edited by Henry C. Bradsby

    One mile below Beach Haven the Seyberts had a store, grist and sawmill, fulling-mill, clover-mill, distillery and plaster-mill—Sebastian and Barney Seybert. They carried on business until the war, when they got into trouble about the whisky tax, which, in the end, broke them up and destroyed all business at that place.

    Sebastian Seybert settled about 1780 near the mouth of Seybert or Varner's creek, about a mile west of Beach Haven, and built a gristmill, sawmill, clothiery and distillery. The gristmill was of logs, had one run of stones, and could grind only from four to six bushels of grain a day. The sawmill was of the old "flutterwheel" style, and would cut about 1,000 feet of lumber in twenty-four hours. The clothiery was of the most primitive kind, and the distillery was the best that could be built at that day. They have all gone to decay except the gristmill, which is now owned by Edward Lutz.

    pence
    Pennsylvania German families took an active role in the American Revolution in Northampton County.
     
     

    Pennsylvania is one of the 13 original states and was originally founded in 1681 as a result of a royal land grant to William Penn, the son of the state's namesake.

    The Luzerne Legal Register, Volume 13 by George Brubaker

    . . . Jacob Kisner, was a native of Northampton county (born 1772). He removed at an early day to Salem township, in this county, where he married Margaret [Seybert], daughter of Sebastian Seybert, sen. Under Mr. Seybert's will, proved in 1810, Mrs. Kisner was devised "one hundred and fifty acres of land in Shickshinny valley," in the township of Salem.

    . . . The mother of the subject of our sketch [Elliott Kisner] is Ann, daughter of Sebastian Seybert, jun., and is a native of Salem township. Sebastian Sibert, sen. (now spelled Seybert), settled about 1780 in Salem township, near the mouth of Seybert's creek, about a mile west of Beach Haven. Here he built a grist mill, saw mill, fulling mill, and a distillery. The grist mill was of logs, had but one run of stones, and could grind only from four to six bushels of grain a day. The saw mill was of the old "flutter wheel" style, and would cut about one thousand feet of lumber in twenty-four hours. The fulling mill was of the most primitive kind; and the distillery was the best that could be built at that day.

    Mr. Seybert was one of a family of several brothers, who removed to Salem shortly after the Revolutionary war. Both he and his son, Sebastian, were natives of Northampton county, Pa. He was one of the wealthy men of his day, and at the time of his death, in 1810, was the owner of seven hundred acres of the best land in Salem township.

    His son, Sebastian Seybert, jun., succeeded him in the milling business, and added a store and blacksmith shop to the other industries named. On March 17, 1824, he was commissioned by Governor Shulze a justice of the peace for the townships of Huntington, Salem, and Union. The appointment was during good behavior, or, in other words, for life. It is to be regretted that the law was ever changed, for in those days only worthy and intelligent men were chosen. In 1833 he was elected one of the county commissioners of Luzerne county for three years.

    Lush forests in Colonial America allowed settlers to build wooden homes.

     
     
    A militia is a military unit composed of citizens who are called up in time of need.

    Portraits and Biographical Lee County Illinois 1892

    Wallace Seybert. . .was born in Salem Township, Luzerne County, Pa., February 16, 1817, and is the son of Honteter Seybert, a native of Lehigh County, Pa. The grandfather of our subject, Sebastian Seybert, was a native of Germany, and when a young man emigrated with his brother to this country and served their time to pay for their passage on a sailing vessel across the Atlantic. After paying their passage, they located in Lehigh County, Pa., where Sebastian was married to a Miss Baughman, who was of German parentage. The young couple settled in what is now Salem Township, Luzerne County, Pa., where they were among the first settlers, and there improved a homestead from the timber land. He was a successful farmer until his death, which occurred when he was more than seventy years old. His wife also died in Luzerne County at an advanced age. They were members of the Lutheran Church and helped organize a church of that denomination in Salem Township.

    The grandparents of our subject had a family of six sons and two daughters, namely: Henry, Michael, Sebastian, Jr., Honteter, Barney, Nicholas, Elizabeth and Margaret. All lived to mature years, married, reared families and died between the ages of fifty and eighty years. They were farmers by occupation in Pennsylvania, and were members of the Lutheran Church. Honteter [Seybert], father of our subject, was the fourth son and fifth child in the family, and was reared mostly in Luzerne County. His wife, whose maiden name was Margaret Zimmerman, was born and reared in Northampton County, Pa., and was descended from German ancestors, who were early settlers of Schuylkill County.

    After his marriage, Honteter Seybert lived on a farm in Salem Township, Luzerne County, where he died at the age of eighty. His wife departed this life when three-score years of age. Through industry they built up a good home and gained a comfortable competency. Religiously, he was a Lutheran, while she belonged to the Presbyterian Church, which was the faith of her ancestors. They were the parents of six sons and three daughters, namely: George, Honteter, Jr., Reuben, James, Wallace, Baughman, Nancy, Polly and Savilla. George was drowned in his father's mill race, and Baughman died when eighteen years old, but the other children lived to mature years. Our subject is the only member of the family now living, and he passed his boyhood upon his father's farm.

     

    A sawmill was an important developmental step in a community. Before sawmills, boards could only be sawn by two men with a whipsaw. In a sawmill, the circular motion of a water wheel was changed to the back-and-forth motion of the saw blade with a pitman arm.

     

     
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