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An American Family History

Heinrich Bauman and Catherine Dreisbach

 
Lower Towamensing Township, Carbon County, Pennsylvania
 
 
Bauman is also spelled Baughman, Baumann, Boman, and Bowman.
 
Carbon County, Pennsylvania was created in 1843 from parts of Northampton and Monroe Counties.

Heinrich Bauman and Catherine Dreisbach married in the mid 18th century. They were Lutherans.

They lived in Lower Towamensing Township, Carbon County, Pennsylvania. They lived in a large stone house which was two miles north of Lehigh Gap, near the Towamensing church. The

family was occasionally threatened by the Indians, and in one instance Mr. Bauman sent his wife and children to a place near Easton for safety, while he remained alone in the wilderness.

Susanna Barbara Bauman Kern was born October 27, 1768.

John Dieter Bauman was born, the year of the Boston Tea Party, June 30, 1773.

Anna Maria Bauman Schneider (Snyder) was born February 4, 1776.

Christina Bauman Branstetter was born about 1780.

Henry Bauman was born September 13, 1781.

Heinrich died on November 27, 1824 in Lehigh Gap, Carbon County, Pennsylvania. He was buried at St. John's Church Cemetery in Palmerton, Carbon County.

Catherine died on August 28, 1825 in Towamensing, Carbon County, Pennsylvania.

 

Lutherans are Protestants who follow Martin Luther's religious teachings, especially the doctrine of justification by faith alone.
 

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Pennsylvania German families took an active role in the American Revolution in Northampton County.

from The History of the Counties of Lehigh & Carbon by Alfred Mathews and Austin N. Hungerford

The ancestors of the Bauman family emigrated from Germany. Henry Bauman, the grandfather of Dennis, was among the first settlers of Northampton County north of the Blue Mountains, in Towamensing township, now Lower Towamensing township, Carbon Co. The place he chose for settlement was about two miles north of Lehigh Gap, near where the Lutheran and German Reformed Church now stands. The first thing he did was to clear land, thus making a farm for himself and family. He also followed the lumbering business, and spent much time in hunting and trapping.

His family consisted of four children, equally divided in sex. In those days the settlers were frequently persecuted by the Indians, so much so that at one time Mr. Bauman was forced to send his wife and family to a place near Easton for safety. When his sons arrived at the age of maturity they were married.

mother
First printed in Boston 1745

Pennsylvania is one of the 13 original states and was originally founded in 1681 as a result of a royal land grant to William Penn, the son of the state's namesake.

 
 
 

History of Lehigh County, Pennsylvania by Lehigh County Historical Society

Henry Bauman, son of John Dieter and Eva Elizabeth Bauman, was born Sept. 29, 1751. He followed farming and lumbering and lived in a large stone house which he built two miles north of Lehigh Gap, near the Towamensing church, and which is still standing. His family was occasionally threatened by the Indians, and in one instance Mr. Bauman sent his wife and children to a place near Easton for safety, while he remained alone in the wilderness. He was a member of the Lutheran church. He died Nov. 27, 1824.

Mr. Bauman married Catharine Dreisbach, who was born March 5, 1754, and died August 28, 1825. They had four children: John Dieter, Henrv, Anna Mary, and Susanna B.

 
 
 
 

The date of settlement of the Baumans is unknown. Honstetter Bauman is a name found in an old draft as owning land that in 1791 belonged to Bernard Bauman. In 1781 the name of Henry Bauman appears. On the 22nd of May, 1788, Bernard Barman took a warrant for one hundred acres of land at Lehigh Gap. On the 18th of November, 1808, he sold thirty acres of the tract to Joseph Bauman, who built the stone tavern at the Gap, and lived there until 1814, and on the 15th of March in that year he sold it to Thomas Craig, in whose possession and that of his descendants it has been retained to the present.

In an old draft it is mentioned that the Snyders were in possession of this tract, but it does not appear that they warranted the tract.

Nothing is known of who were the descendants of Honstetter, Bernard or Joseph Bauman. Henry Bauman, supposed to be a brother of Bernard, had two sons, John D. and Henry Bowman.