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An American Family History

Eva Elizabeth Bloss Seidel

 
Bloss is also spelled Blose, Bloß and Bose, Bloz, Blos, Blotz, Blows, Bloce, Blois, Blass, Blaas, Plose.
 
Northampton County, Pennsylvania is on the eastern border of the state in the Lehigh Valley. It was formed in 1752 from parts of Bucks County. Easton is the county seat.

The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) was between the Kingdom of Great Britain and the 13 colonies which became the newly formed United States.

Eva Elizabeth Bloss Seidel was born about 1755 in Heidelberg Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania. Her parents were Johann Conrad Bloss and Anna Magdalena Reber.

On December 10, 1771 Eva Elizabeth Bloss and William Peter acted as sponsors for Eva Elizabeth, a daughter of Michael and Catherine Greenewalt.

She married Peter Seidel (Seidle, Sidle). According to his Revolutionary War pension application, he was born November 24, 1755 in Heidelberg. A Peter Seidel appeared on the list of those who helped form the Heidelberg Church in 1757.

He was a private in the Pennsylvania militia. At first he was a substitute for George Bloss. He served two months under the command of Captain Sorber and Colonel Nicholas Kern. He marched to Germantown. Then he was drafted, but was permitted to return home for three days for some clothes.

After that he returned as a corporal under the command of Adam Kunkel. He was not in any battle. In 1778 he was drafted again and served for two months under Captain Adam Kunkel. He carried a rifle and marched to the Blue Mountains to the Mohany and served two months against the indigenous people.

In 1779 he remained at home about two months and returned to duty and marched under the command of Nicholas Miller and Colonel Nicholas Kern and marched behind the Blue Mountains against the indigenous people and returned home in June, 1779.

They lived on a farm two miles west of Best Station, Washington Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania. Peter Seidel appeared in the tax list for Heidelberg township in 1781, 1785, 1789, and 1790.

On July 3, 1792 Peter Seidel received a land warrant for 25 acres and one for 50 acres in Northampton County, Pennsylvania and on March 11, 1794, Peter Seidel, received a warrant for 400 acres in Northampton.

In 1800 the Peter Seidel family appeared in "Heydelberg" Township, Northampton County, Pennsylvania. The household consisted of a man and a woman between 26 and 44, a woman over 45, a woman between 16 and 25, a girl between 16 and 25, a boy and a girl under 10. The older woman was Elizabeth's mother, Magdalena Bloss, who lived with Peter Seidel from 1798 until her death in 1803. He was also the administrator of her estate.

In 1820 Peter Seidel appeared in Heidelberg Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania. The household consisted of a man older than 45 and a woman between 26 and 45.

In March, 1831, Peter began receiving a pension of $26.66 for his service in the Revolutionary war.

Heidelberg Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania originally included Washington Township and Slatington. It is located on Trout Creek and Jordan Creek.

Children of
Johann Conrad Bloss and
Anna Magdalena Reber Bloss
  • John George Bloss
  • Eva Elizabeth Bloss Seidel
  • Maria Margaretha Bloss Brandstetter
  • Daniel Bloss
  • Peter Bloss
  • Henry Bloss
  • Sonia Bloss
  • Conrad Bloss
  • Pennsylvania German families took an active role in the American Revolution in Northampton County.

    Pennsylvania is one of the 13 original states and was originally founded in 1681 as a result of a royal land grant to William Penn, the son of the state's namesake.

     

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    from "Bloss Family" from History of Lehigh County, Pennsylvania compiled by Clinton J. Bloss.

    Eva Elizabeth Bloss, daughter of Conrad, was born in Washington township. The first mention we find of her is Dec. 10, 1771, when Eva Elizabeth Bloss and William Peter acted sponsors for Eva Elizabeth, a daughter of Michael and Catherine Greenewalt.

    She married Peter Seidel; they lived on a farm two miles west of Best Station as late as 1816.

    Choosing a Godparent sponsor was not just a formality in 17th century Germany. Each child had one Godparent of the same gender. It established ties between families that were near kinship. The Godparent was expected to provide spiritual support and material support in times of need.