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An American Family History

Munro Family of Leeds County, Ontario

  or Munro, Monro, Monroe  

Connecticut's first European settlers were Dutch.

The first European settlements in Ontario were after the American Revolution when 5,000 loyalists left the new United States.

John Munro was born in 1745 in Fairfield County, Connecticut.

He married Catherine Reid.

John and Catherine's children included:

John Munro (1766, married Annetje (Hannah) Alyea),
Samuel Munro, Sr. (1768, married Maria Alyea),
Catherine (Kitty) Munro (1769, married Thomas Proctor),
Daniel Munro (1770),
Timothy Munro (1782, married Sarah Gray), and
Robert Munro (1782).

Sam Sherwood Esquire disposeth that Samuel Munro joined the Royal Standard before the Treaty of Separation in 1783.

After John died, Catherine took the name Leech and had three more children.

Mary Leach,
Sarah Ward (married Cruth Patterson), and
Truelove Golden (father, Thomas Golden (Goulden), married Walter Adams).

Catherine came to Canada in 1782. She was part of the group of widows and orphans who fled to Canada.

Catharine and her children were granted land near Mallorytown, Leeds County, Ontario.

Catherine Leech sent a petition from Augusta township in August, 1789:

That your Petitioner had Considerable property taken from her in the Colonies, & her husband was Murdered By the rebels, on account of his attachment to the British Government.

That your petitioner is Desirous of becoming an Inhabitant in this District. She therefore prays the Home Board will be pleased to Grant her two Hundred acres of Land, as a Compensation for her Losses and Sufferings .

The United Empire Loyalist list included:

Catherine Leech, her children
John Munroe Their father, during the war, in the new States.

Jannet Munroe
Robert Munroe
Daniel Munroe
Kitty Munroe now married to Proctor
Mary Leech, now Britain, illegitimate.
Sarah Ward, now Patterson, illegitimate.
Trulove Golden, now Adams, illegitimate.
December 20, 1811.

Catharine appeared on the Yonge Township census in 1802, 1803, and i1810.

Timothy was assessed in Yonge Township in 1805.

During the War of 1812 John, Samuel and Timothy were with the 1st Regiment Leeds Militia.

United Empire Loyalists were Americans who remained loyal to King George III and the British Empire. They moved to Canada after the American Revolution.

Fairfield County, Connecticut originally consisted of the towns of Rye, Greenwich, Stamford, Norwalk, Fairfield, and Stratford. Woodbury (1673) , Danbury (1687), Ridgefield (1709), Newtown (1711), and New Fairfield (1740) were added later. In 1751, part of Woodbury was included in Litchfield County.

 
 
 

John Munro, Jr. was born about 1766.

He married Hannah Alyea.

John Munro (1793, married Electa Baxter),
Samuel (2nd) Munro (1797).
Hannah Munro (1802),
Polly LaRue Munro (1804, married Harry Polly),
Simon Munro (1808, married Parmelia Connell),
Asenath Munro (1811),
James Munro (1812), and
Alfred Alpheus Munro ((1814, married Lydia Ayers).

During the War of 1812 he was a private in Captain John Howard's Company, 1st Regiment Leeds Militia.

John was assessed in Yonge Township in 1805.

John died on January 8, 1849. He and Hannah are buried in the Mallorytown Cemetery.

In memory of John Munro
Who died Jan'y 8 1849
In the 83 year of his age
Also
Hannah
His wife
Died Aug 17 1852
In the 77 year of her age
Blessed are the dead who died in the Lord
 

 
 
 
 

Samuel Munro was born about 1768 in New York.

He married Maria Alyea.

Catherine Munro (1798, married David Dean),
Elizabeth Munro (1800, married Jonathan Dean),
Esther Munro (1802, married Richard Skelding),
Margaret Munro (1803, married John Fisher),
Malcolm Munro (1804),
Bradford A. Munro (1805),
Samuel Reid Munro, Jr. (1807, married Eliza Jane Mosher),
Peter M. Munro (1810, married Sarah Jane Lamar),
Charles W. Munro (1812, married Elizabeth McGwire),
Justina Munro (1813, married Thomas Proctor),
Johnson Josiah Munro (1817, married Elizabeth Kerlin), and
Walter A. Munro (1819, married ELizabeth Sayles).

From 25 September 1812 to 24 December 1812, he was a sergeant in Captain John Howard's Company, 1st Regiment Leeds Militia.

From 10 April 1813 to 24 September 1813 he was a private in Captain Andrew Adams' Company of Provincial Light Dragoons.

From 25 January 1814 to 24 February 1814 he was a private in Captain Richard D. Fraser's Company of Provincial Light Dragoons of the Eastern & Johnstown District.

Samuel was assessed in Yonge Township in 1805.

The Petition of Samuel Munro of the township of York, yeoman,
Humbly sheweth that your petitioner is the son of Catherine Leach late of the County of Leeds in the Johnstown District Deceased formerly widow of John Munro also deceased that said Catherine Leach is entered on the list of the province as a U.E. Loyalist (etc)
23 Nov 1836.
signed Samuel Munro
Township of York in the Home District.
Charles Munro was present and saw Samuel Munro sign the petition.

He died before 1838.

On February 7, 1813, the American army raided Elizabethtown (present day Brockville, Leeds County, Ontario). The Americans crossed the frozen St. Lawrence River and seized equipment, freed American prisoners, and captured Canadian men.

 

The Battle of the Windmill was in November, 1838. Loyalists defeated an invasion attempt by Hunter Patriots, led by  Nils von Schoultz, who were attempting to overthrow British rule. The battle was at a windmill two miles east of Prescott.

Windmill
 
 

 

 
     
 

Daniel Munro

Henry Munro (1802)
Timothy Munro (1803),
Mary Munro (1809),
Randall Munro ,
George Munro.

Daniel assessed in Yonge Township in 1805.

 
     
     
 

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