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An American Family History

Mary Estey Dwinnell

The settlement of New Meadows was incorporated as the Town of Topsfield by authority of the General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1650. The church "gathered" on November 4, 1663 with the Rev. Thomas Gilbert. The third Meeting House was built on the Common in 1703 with Rev. Joseph Capen as pastor.

Women played an essential role in American society as mothers and homemakers.

Mary Estey (Estes) Dwinnell was born on June 1, 1730 in Topsfield. Her parents were Aaron Estey and Esther Richards.

She married Benjamin Dwinnell in 1751 when she was about 22 years old. Their children and life together are described in detail in the Benjamin and Mary Dwinnell Family section.

She was left a widow in 1805 when her husband died. She appeared as the “Widow Dwinel" in the 1810 census.

She died on March 5, 1820 when she was 92 years old in Keene, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. She is buried in the North or Court Street Burial Ground in Keene with her husband, Benjamin.

New Hampshire was first settled by Europeans in 1623. It was separated from Massachusetts in 1679.

Most Americans were farmers in the 18th and early 19th centuries.

The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) was between the Kingdom of Great Britain and the 13 colonies which became the newly formed United States.

Keene, Cheshire County, New Hampshire was settled after 1736 and was a fort protecting Massachusetts during the French and Indian Wars. It was called Upper Ashuelot. When New Hampshire separated from Massachusetts in 1741 it became Keene, New Hampshire. During King George's War, the village was attacked and burned.

Children of Benjamin Dwinnell
and Mary Estey

  • Jonathan Dwinnell
  • Thomas Dwinnell
  • Mary Dwinnell Pomeroy
  • Elizabeth Dwinnell Banks
  • Abigail Dwinnell Francis
  • Hannah Dwinnell Wheeler
  • Benjamin Dwinnell
  • Israel Dwinnell
  • Sarah Dwinnell Colony
  • Esther Dwinnell Metcalf
  • Children of Aaron Estey
    & Esther Richards
  • Isaac Estey
  • Aaron Estey
  • Hannah Estey Towne
  • Mary Estey Dwinnell
  • Isaac Estey
  • Abigail Estey
  • Esther Estey
  • William Estey
  • Daniel Estey
  • Esther Estey Balch
  • Aaron Estey
  • William Estey
  • Three daughters of William Towne and Joanna Blessing were wrongly accused of practicing witchcraft in Salem. Rebecca Towne Nurse, Mary Towne Estey, and Sarah Towne Bridges Cloyes were persecuted in 1692. The children of people in the line below are all descendants of Mary Estey.

    William Towne,
    Mary Towne Estey,
    Isaac Estey,
    Aaron Estey
    ,
    Mary Estey Dwinnell
    ,
    Israel Dwinnell,
    Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Sr.,
    Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Jr.
    ,
    Victoria Zellena Dwinnell
    ,
    Robert Wilson Miller, Sr
    .,
    Robert Wilson Miller, Jr.
     

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    DNA match with other descendant in this line.
    Richard Kimball
    John Kimball
    Abigail Kimball Estey
    Aaron Estey
    Mary Estey Dwinnell
    Israel Dwinnell
    Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Sr.
    Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Jr.
    Victoria Dwinnell Miller
    Robert Wilson Miller, Sr.
    Robert Wilson Miller, Jr.