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An American Family History

William Fry

Weymouth is the second oldest town in Massachusetts. It was established in 1622 and incorporated in 1635. The town was a fishing and agricultural community. 

William Fry was born in England about 1600.

He had twelve acres granted to him in Weymouth in 1636.

His wife was named Elizabeth. Their children and life together are described in detail in the section on William and Elizabeth Fry.

He died at Weymouth, Norfolk County, Massachusetts on October 26, 1642 when he was about 42 years old.

Fry Family Table of Contents
Alternate spellings of Fry: Ffrey, Frie, Frey, Frye

Old Style Calendar
Before 1752 the year began on Lady Day, March 25th,. Dates between January 1st and March 24th were at the end of the year. Old Style (O.S.) and New Style (N.S.) are used to indicate whether the year has been adjusted. Often both dates are used.
The Fry Siblings:
  • William Fry
  • Thomasin Fry Meigs
  • Mary Fry Harris
  • Hannah Fry Rawlins
  • Lush forests in Colonial America allowed settlers to build wooden homes.

     

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    New London County, Connecticut was one of four original Connecticut counties and was established on May 10, 1666, by an act of the Connecticut General Court.

    Record of the Descendants of Vincent Meigs by Henry Benjamin Meigs

    William Fry, Sr. of Weymouth, Eng. (according to M. Fayette Meigs) b. about 1568-701 probably m. about 1590-95 Sarah Hill of Lyme Regis, dau. of James and Judith Hill, and granddau. of John and Thomasine Jurdaine. They had (or certainly Wm. Fry had—whether we give him the correct information or not) the following children and probably others:

    dau. Hannah, b. perhaps 1591 95, who m. Wm. Rawlins, and emigrated to America.

    dau. Mary, b. 1593-97, who m. Walter Harris and emigrated to America 1632, on ship William and Frances, Weymouth, Mass., and New London, Ct

    dau. Thomasine, b. about 1610-12, m. 1632 John Meggs and emigrated to America, etc., etc.

    son William Jr., b. about 1600, who emigrated to Weymouth, Mass., and there d. 1642. Gives to Thos. Rawlin's, Thomas Harris and John Meggs, his three sisters' youngest children, each a kid. See will in N. E. Reg. Vol. 2, p. 385. We have positive proofs from Rawlin's Gen. and Mrs. Walter Harris' will, and William Fry's, Jr., will, that the above four people were brothers and sisters. We have it from Fayette M. Meigs, of Cal., that Thomasine or Tamzin Fry Meigs, wife of John Meigs, was a dau. of William Fry, Sr., of Weymouth, England.

    Europeans who made the voyage to America faced a difficult journey of several months.
     
     
         
    It was common for bequests to include wearing apparel.

    This may be to witnes & give testimony, under the hands of those whom hane hereunto subscribed their names that Wm ffry of Waymouth who dyed the 26 of october, 1642, being sicke & weake in body. 

    To his wife after his decease his house & foure acres of land being his home lot, & after her decease

    to his two daughters, Elizabeth & Mary. To his two daus. 2 acres of mead & sixe acres of land lying by the mill, also to each of them a Goate. 

    To Thomas Harris, Thomas Rawlens & John Meggs his three sisters youngest children, each of them a kid. 

    The rest of estate to wife.
    Thomas Baily
    John Burge
    deposed by the above named before the court
    the 9 of the 9 mo. 1643

    from Suffolk County Wills, Abstracts of the Earliest Wills Upon Record, p. 17

    Early European settlers in the American colonies were mostly farmers and craftsmen. They had to work hard to provide daily neccesities for themselves.