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An American Family History

Richard Land

Maryland was established with religious freedom for Catholics. The colonial economy was based on tobacco cultivated by Africans who had been enslaved.
Mister ( Mr.) was derived from master and Mrs. and Miss were derived from mistress. They indicated people of superior social status in colonial America.

Richard Land was born about 1660 in Charles County, Maryland. His parents were Philip Land and Rebecca Wright.

He married Mary Harris, widow of Thomas Harris.

She died before 1686 when he was the admistrator of both estates.

In 1685 Richard Land and John Beare were given license "to play a prize at the several weapons belonging to the noble science." Prize playing was a test of a man's martial skill against many opponents. The weapons included the rapier, quarterstaff, and broadsword.

He married Penelope Theobald about 1687. Their children and life together are discussed in detail in the section on Richard and Penelope Land.

In 1689 he appraised the estate of Mr. Francis Masson and in 1692 he appraised the estate of Charles Stephens.

Richard, Sr. died on March 22, 1695 when he was 35 years old. Penelope Land was the administratrix of his estate.

Piccowaxen Parish, Maryland was on Cobb Neck between the Wicomico and Potomac Rivers. It has been spelled as Pickawaxon, Pickiawaxen, Pickwaten, Pickwixon, Pykawaxen in Douglas family records. Christ Church Wayside was built there in 1692.The parish became William and Mary Parish.

Charles County is in south central Maryland and was created in 1658. The first settlers were mainly English tobacco planters, their indentured servants and enslaved people. Many of of the settlers were Roman Catholic. The county, as originally laid out, also included parts of present day Calvert, Prince George's and St. Mary's Counties.

 

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from the Archives of Maryland Volume 17,

Lycense for prize playing
Maryland ss.
By the Councill
Lycense is hereby given to John Beare and Richard Land, to play a prize at the severall weapons belonging to the noble science (such as shall be agreed on by them) publickly at such place in or neere St Maries City, as they shall for this day appoint, provided that noe fowle play be used nor any riott or disturbance, tending to the breach of his Lsps: peace be by them or any of their associates thereupon offered.
Dated at the Councill Chamber at the City of St Maries
this second day of October 1685:
Signed p ordr
J Llewellin Cl Consil

 
 
 
 

Mr. Francis Masson
10.273 I Charles County £7.3.6
Jun 14 1689
Appraisers: Robert Yeats, Richard Land.
Administrator: Mr. Joseph Cornell.

 
 
 
 

Charles Stephens
10.251 I Charles County £36.4.14
Feb 17 1692
Items in possession of Mary Sarjent (relict), now wife of William Sarjent.
Appraisers: Richard Land, John Wheeler.

 
 

Richard Long [Land] 10.382 A
£91.17.2
£97.0.6 Aug 2 1695
Payments to: Anne Huth, Jeffy Cole, Francis Shefeill, Mr. Thomas Hussey, Hon, John Court, Esq., Ralph Smith, William Smith, Francis Green, Maj. William Dent, William Thompson, Robert Carss, John Ross, Thomas Gibson, Gilbert Clarie, Alderman Haughton, Mr. Thomson (minister), Stephen Mankin, George Scroggin, John Courts, Sr., John Downes, Capt. Randolph Brent [Brandt], John Dougles, Thomas Carvile, Thomas Worland.
Mentions: Jonas Kinsburry on 4 May 1696.
Distribution to: widow (unnamed), orphans (unnamed).
Administratrix: Mrs. Penelope Land.

Planter is an archaic term for a settler. Plantation was a method of colonization where settlers were "planted" abroad. A plantation is also the kind of large farm that was the economical basis of many American Colonies and owners of these farms were also called planters.

American colonists continued to use British monetary units, namely the pound, shilling and pence for which £1 (or li) equalled 20s and 1s equalled 12d. In 1792 the dollar was established as the basic unit of currency.
     
     

 

Bauman & Dreisbach
 
 
 

©Roberta Tuller 2017
tuller.roberta@gmail.com