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An American Family History

Elizabeth Theobald Corker Wheeler

Theobald is also spelled: Theobaldes, Theobaldo, Theobalds, Theoball, Theoballs, Theobals, Theobold, Theobolds, Theboult. (Pronounced Tibbals)
crest
Arms-Gules, six crosses, crosslet fitchée or.
Crest-A phoenix with wings expanded sable in flames proper.
A society's legal system reveals much about it. A broad spectrum of behavior was considered criminal in Colonial Maryland and punishment was harsh.

Elizabeth (Eliza) Theobald was born about 1656 in Virginia. Her parents were Clement and Mary Theobald.

In July, 1662 her father gave her and her Godfather, Captain Robert Troope "a brown pied heifer." Captain Troope patented a tract called Scotland Yard about 1663 which is just north of Capital Hill in Washington, D. C.

In 1662 her godfather gave her "a yearling heifer."

In 1666 she inherited the residue of her Godfather's estate.

Elizabeth married Thomas Corker (Corkey or Corka).

Thomas came to Maryland as an indentured servant in 1663.

In 1668, Thomas was found guilty of manslaughter by misadventure for shooting and killing Richard Turner who was sleeping in Elizabeth's father, Clement Theobald's, woodpile. He and her mother, Mary, were witnesses at the indictment and Clement was also on the jury that tried and then pardoned Corker.

Thomas Corker obtained a patent for 150 acres of the Betty's Delight tract in 1671. It was probably named in honor of his wife, Elizabeth. He also was also granted patents for Corker's Hogghole (100 acres) and Planter's Delight (100 acres), which were tracts contiguous to Betty's Delight.

At some time, Thomas sold part of Betty's Delight to his father-in--law, Clement Theobold. Clement sold it back to him.

In 1674, Thomas bought a tract of 150 acres called His Excellency's Gift on the west side of Portobacco Creek from Edmund Lyndsey for 12,000# of tobacco.

In 1676 Job Cornor left Elizabeth personal possessions and Thomas a 300 acre plantation.

Thomas Corker wrote his will on November 17, 1676. He left most of his estate to his wife, Elizabeth. The will mentioned a house, gardens, orchards, and buildings. He left personal property to Penelope Rigge, Thomas Rigge, George Langham, Benjamin Roger, William Chandler, Richard Chandler, Clement Theobald and John Theobald.

His will was proved on May 12, 1677.

Her second husband was James Wheeler. He was born on December 16, 1656 in Charles County. He was the son of John Wheeler.

Elizabeth and James' children included:
Anne Wheeler (about 1687),
John Wheeler (about 1687), and
James Wheeler (about 1680).

In March, 1679 James sued Thomas Hussey for a debt of 400 pounds of tobacco. In December, 1680 he sued Thomas Hussey for execution on the earlier judgement. In April, 1681, John Hussey counter-sued James for 3,000 pounds of tobacco.

Elizabeth died on May 11, 1682 in Charles County, Maryland.

After Elizabeth died, James married Catherine.

James died in December, 1684.

Catherine married Moses Jones. She passed away shortly after, and Moses Jones then married Elizabeth Jenkins.

Thomas Corker obtained a patent for 200 acres of Betty's Delight in 1671.
Corker sold part to Clement Theobald in 1675.
Clement's son, John Theobald, left it to his son, William Theobald. It was then in Baltimore County.
John Hanson acquired 100 acres in 1676 and left them to his son Robert.
In 1746, Robert Hanson left it to his grandson Robert Hanson (son of Samuel Hanson).

Children of Clement and Mary Theobald:
  • Penelope Theobald Morris Land
  • Thomas Theobald
  • Clement Theobald, Jr.
  • John Theobald
  • Elizabeth Theobald Corker Wheeler
  • Charles County is in south central Maryland and was created in 1658. The first settlers were mainly English tobacco planters, their indentured servants and enslaved people. Many of of the settlers were Roman Catholic. The county, as originally laid out, also included parts of present day Calvert, Prince George's and St. Mary's Counties.

     

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    The first European settlements in Maryland were made in 1634 when English settlers created a permanent colony.

    from National Reigister of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Statement of Significance

    Thomas Corker obtained a patent of 150 acres of the Betty's Delight tract in 1671. His home, one of the earliest in Maryland, is believed to have been built circa 1671-1675, as the dwelling which was cited in Corker's will, written November 17, 1676. Corker died shotly after composing his will.

    He also acquired in 1668, the unique distinction in the Province's early legal history of being one of two men found guilty of "manslaughter by misadventure." In 1668, Corker was indicted, tried, and found guilty, sentenced and pardoned for "Manslaughter by misadventure" for shooting dead one Richard Turner, asleep in Clement Theobald's woodpile. Witnesses in the indictment were Clement Theobald and his wife, Mary, Corker's future father and mother-in-law. Clement Theobald was also on the jury that tried and then pardoned Corker.

    At the time Corker obtained Betty's Delight in 1671, he also was granted patents for Corker's Hogghole (100 acres) and Planter's Delight (100 acres), which were tracts contiguous to Betty's Delight.

    John Hanson, the grandfather of John Hanson, President (1781-2) of the United States in congress Assembled, acquired the dwelling and 100 acres of Betty's Delight in 1676. He will[ed] it to his son Colonel Robert Hanson, who acquired the property in 1731.

    from Historical:

    Thomas Corker's Will- Dated Nov. 17 1676. Hall of Records, Liber 5, folio 289, Annapolis, Maryland.

    He leaves most of his estate to his wife Elizabeth - hence the name Betty's Delight. It is believed Thomas Corker built the house because in a deed dated 1675 on January 11th... Mentioned in the will are - house, gardens, orchards, buildings, etc.

    Thomas Corker also sold part of Betty's Delight to Clement Theobold (no record because in a deed dated Jube (sic) 8th 1675 (liber F-#1Folio 106, court house, La Plata.) Clement Theobold sells it back to Thomas Corker saying it once belonged to said Thomas Corker.

    A land patent is an exclusive land grant made by the government. The certificate that grants the land rights is also called first-title deed and final certificate. In the United States, all land can be traced back to the original land patent.

    Thomas Corker obtained a patent for 200 acres of Betty's Delight in 1671.
    Corker sold part to Clement Theobald in 1675.
    Clement's son, John Theobald, left it to his son, William Theobald. It was then in Baltimore County.
    John Hanson acquired 100 acres in 1676 and left them to his son Robert.
    In 1746, Robert Hanson left it to his grandson Robert Hanson (son of Samuel Hanson).

     
     
     

    Charles County Circuit Court, Liber A;
    8 Jul 1662, Page 213
    Deed of Gift: Robert Troop, Gent. gives to his God-daughter, Elisabeth Theoballs, a yearling heifer; 1 May 1662;
    signed Robert Troope;
    wit. George Thompson, William Hills, Nicholas Rawlins

    Cattle were vital to a household and an important legacy.
    Unweaned cattle are calves.
    Female cattle are heifers and cows (had a calf).
    Male cattle are steers (castrated) and bulls.
    Oxen
    are trained draft animals and are often castrated adult male cattle.

    A gentleman had no title, but descended from an aristocratic family, was of the landed gentry, and had a coat of arms.
     
     
    Testis (Test) is latin for witness. Testes is the plural.

    Maryland Calendar of Wills 1. 260 at the Maryland Archives

    Troope, Robert Capt., Charles Co., 20th July, 1666;
    1st Aug., 1666.
    To Eliza:, wife of Joseph Harrison, Mary Harrison, dau. of said Joseph, Mary, wife of James Lindsey, Eliza: Lindsey, dau. of said James, personalty.
    To Richard Harrison, son of said Joseph, 150 A. French Lewis, 100 A. Troupe's Supply, and 150 A. adjoining Henry Sylly's
    To James Lindsey and James Macoy and their heirs forever, 150 A. on Anacostine River.
    To goddau. Eliza Theobald and hrs., residue of estate, real and personal. In event of death of said Eliza: before majority, estate to be divided among John Browne, Thomas Elleson, Mary Lindsey, dau. of James Lindsey, and
    exs. Ignatius Cursine and Stephen Montague.
    Test: Nicholas Fline, Leonard Green.

     
     
     
     

    Morris Murfee maintained that Captain Robert Troope had wounded and lamed him, the jury awarded Murfee eight thousand pounds of tobacco damages. (XLI, 588, 591).

     
     
     
     

    The Maryland and Delaware Genealogist

    The house was built in 1671 by Thomas Corker, who came into the Province of Maryland as an indentured person to cover his passage fees in 1663. In just five years, 1668, Thomas Corker was cited as a planter. . .

     
     
     
    Personal property can be called personalty (personality), goods, chattels, articles, or movable property. It includes both animate or inanimate property.

    Charles County Circuit Court Liber E, Page 182
    11 Aug 1674;
    Indenture from Edmund Lyndsey, planter, to Thomas Corker, planter; for 12,000# of tobacco; a tract of land called His Excellency's Gift; bounded by Bartholomew Coates on the west side of Portobacco Creek; laid out for 150 acres;
    signed Edmund Lindsey (mark);
    wit. Railph Coates, Will Deane

    Planter is an archaic term for a settler. Plantation was a method of colonization where settlers were "planted" abroad. A plantation is also the kind of large farm that was the economical basis of many American Colonies and owners of these farms were also called planters.

     
     
     
    In contracts and pleadings usually people and things mentioned before are designated by the term said (sd ) for clarity. Aforesaid (afd, afsd, aforesd ) means it was already mentioned.

    from Maryland Calendar of Wills, Volume 1

    Cornor, Job, Charles Co.,
    9th Nov., 1676; 16th Apr., 1676-7.
    To Thomas Rigg and Eliza:, wife of Thomas Corker personalty. Wife Anne, execx. and residuary legatee of estate, real and personal, during life. To Thomas Corker, plantation, 300 A., at death of wife Anne afsd
    Test: Thos. Corker, Philip Brown. 5. 194.

     
     
     
     

    The Maryland Calendar of Wills: Wills from 1635 (earliest probated) to 1685 by Jane Baldwin Cotton and Roberta Bolling Henry

    Corker, Thomas, Chas. Co., 17th Nov., 1676; 12th May, 1677.
    To Penelope Rigge, Thomas Rigge, George Langham, Benjamin Roger, William Chandler, Richard Chandler, Clement Theobald and John Theobald, personalty.
    Wife Eliza: execx. and residuary legatee of estate, real and personal.
    Test: Thos. Coates, Thos. Darcy. 5. 286.

     
     
     
     

    from The Genealogical and Encyclopedic History of the Wheeler Family in America by Albert Gallatin Wheeler, American College of Genealogy

    John Wheeler. He is the only original ancestor of the Maryland branch of the family of whom anything is known definitely. The time of his immigration and the place in Virginia to which he immigrated are matters of conjecture. The Maryland Archives show that a John Wheeler "denizated" in Maryland in the year 1662. . .

    John Wheeler next appears in the Land Records of Maryland, Liber 5, folio 400, where it is recorded that Wheeler's Choice was surveyed for him on Aug. 23, 1662, and patented to him July 10, 1663. This property was situated in Charles County and consisted, according to the record of survey, of 400 acres. He was first a captain and then a major in the Maryland Militia of Charles County. Archives of Maryland, vol. 2, p. 551 states that he was granted 2000 lbs. of tobacco for services, he being mentioned at this time as "Captain."

    In Council Proceedings, Maryland Archives vol. 7, p. 79, A. D. 1681, Major John Wheeler petitions for an allowance of charges in suing out mandamus on certain land. It is recorded in the Proceedings of the General Assembly, Oct. and Nov. 1683, Archives vol. 7, p. 611, that John Wheeler of Charles County was appointed Commissioner for Port Towns. In Council Proceedings for 1685 (Archives vol. 7, p. 386) Major John Wheeler is named Justice for Charles County, and (ibid. vol. 8, p. 7) the same person was appointed Commissioner of Court in Charles County in 1687. In proceedings of the General Assembly for 1689 Major John Wheeler is spoken of as belonging to the militia of Charles County. . .

    It. I give unto my Grandson James Wheeler the son of my son James Wheeler deceased to him his heirs forever two hundred acres of land itt being another part of the five hundred acres aforesd beginning at the end of John Wheelers aforesd .

    It. I give and bequeath unto my Grand Daughter Ann Wheeler the daughter of my son James Wheeler deceased one hundred acres of land it being the remainer part of the five hundred acres of land called Wheelers purchase the other fore hundred to be given to John Wheeler & James Wheeler to her and her heirs forever alsoe I give to my Gran Daughter Ann Wheeler one hundred and sixty five acres of land cauld Wheelers delight & if the sd. Ann Wheeler should dye without heirs of the body lawfully begotten therm to fall to Richard Wheeler the son of my son Thomas and his heirs forever together with one filey to be delivered at my death . . .

    Children:
    John Wheeler, born 1654.
    James Wheeler, born Dec. 16, 1656.
    Mary Wheeler, born March 22, 1658.
    Thomas Wheeler, born March 18, 1660.
    Winnifred Wheeler, born March, 1663.
    Ignatius Wheeler, born May, 1665.
    Francis Wheeler.

    James Wheeler, son of John (9000). Born Dec. 16, 1656. He died before Nov. 11, 1693, the date of his father's will in which his children are spoken of as the children of "my son James Wheeler deed." He married Katherine, who after his decease married for her second husband, Moses Jones. Children: (mentioned in their grandfather's will.)