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An American Family History

 

Blankenship Family

 
  also spelled Blankinship, Blenkinship  
 

Ralph Blankenship was born about 1660 in England.

He arrived in Virginia about 1687 as a headright of Richard Kennon.

He wife may have been Martha Clay.

His children may have included:

William Blankenship (169o, married Mary Riggins),
Richard Blankenship (1691, married Elizabeth Lodewich),
Joseph Blankenship (1694),
Anne Blankenship (1695),
John Blankenship (1697, married Elizabeth Hudson),
James Blankenship (1698), and
Ralph Blankenship, Jr. (1700).

They lived in a part of Henrico County, Virginia that became Chesterfield County in 1749.

 

Henrico County was established in 1634 as one Virginia's eight original shires. Its boundaries incorporated an area from which ten Virginia counties were later formed.

 
 
 

from Henrico County, Virginia Wills

Will of Edward Stanley
To daughter Hannah Thweat, 1 shilling
To wife Martha, items and 1./2 of my land for life
to Grandaughter, Frances Thweatt, my two plantations in Henrico County, the one whereon I live, the other where Richard Dickason lately dwelt, to her and her femal heirs forever; also slaves and items
to grandaughter Mary Thweatt, items
To grandaughter Hannah Thweatt, items
To Ralph Blankenship, John Blankenship, and James Blankenship, my three plantations at Coldwater Run, 230 acres
Wife Martha to be executor
Dated 21 May 1726
Witness Henry Clay, Allason Clark, Samuel Scane
Recorded July 4, 1726

 
 
 
 

John Blankenship was born about 1695 in Henrico County, Virginia. John's father was Ralph Blankenship.

He married Elizabeth Hudson.

They lived in Chesterfield County, Virginia .

On August 28, 1746, John Blankenship bought 227 acres in Henrico County, adjoining Thomas Moore and Gilbert Elam for 25 shillings.

On December 1, 1748 he bought 372 acres in Henrico County, adjoining Gilbert Elam, Henry Clay, Richard Belcher, and John Nunnally onĀ Deep Creek for 40 shillings.

Elizabeth Blankenship (married Jean Morissette),
Hudson Blankenship (1729, married Edith Wilkinson),
William Blankenship (1730),
Henry Blankenship (1735),
Isham Blankenship (1734, married Sarah Wilkinson),
Joseph Blankenship (1738, married Phoebe Summerfield),
Amy Blankenship (1743, married William Turner),
Norvell Blankenship (1746),
Matthew Blankenship (1748),
and Elisha Blankenship.

Slavery is an immoral system of forced labor where people are treated as property to be bought and sold. It was legal in the American Colonies and the United States until the Civil War.
     
     
 
 

Chesterfield County, Virginia was organized in 1749 when the territory south of the James River was separated from Henrico County.

Norvell Blankenship was born about 1746 in a part of Henrico County, Virginia that became Chesterfield County. He was the son of John Blankenship.

Noel Blankenship (1765, married Anna Warren),
Abel Blankenship (1765)
Arthur M. Blankenship (1772)
 
 
 
 

Noel Blankenship was born about 1765 in Chesterfield County, Vriginia. He was the son of Norvell Blankenship.

He married Anna Warren on February 8, 1802 in Lincoln County, Kentucky.

Flora Blankenship (1804)
John Blankenship (1804, married Elizabeth Hinds and Elizabeth Ricketts Larew)
Noah Blankenship (1804)
Mary Blankenship (1806)
James Blankenship (1806)
Henry B. Blankenship (1810)
Joel Blankenship (1810)
Nancy Annie Blankenship (1811)
Maldon Blankenship (1812)

At the time of the 1810 census the family was in Lincoln, Lincoln County, Kentucky. The household consisted of:

a man and a woman between 26 & 44
3 boys under 10
2 girls under 10
a man over 45

In 1820 the family was in Paoli, Cumberland, Kentucky

 

Kentucky was originally a Virginia county and included the lands west of the Appalachians. In 1780, it was divided into Fayette, Jefferson, and Lincoln counties. Kentucky officially became a state on June 1, 1792.

     
 

 

 
 

 

 
     
 

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